An analysis of all the pretty horses by john grady cole

The Texan wanted badly to become a cowboy just like his grandfather though his mother cut short his dreams. This is a story which tells off Rawlins, a friend of Grady whom he ran away with.

An analysis of all the pretty horses by john grady cole

Laconic and pensive, he seems prematurely aged. He lives his life according to a strict, almost ritualistic code, valuing honor, intelligence, responsibility, justice, loyalty, and skill.

An analysis of all the pretty horses by john grady cole

Above all other things, he loves horses, with which he is preternaturally gifted, and the cowboy life, the solitude and dignity of the West. We know little about Rawlins physically, just that at age seventeen he is tall and thin, with long arms.

Rawlins is louder, more impatient and less introspective than Cole; he is also the less intelligent and less skilled member of the partnership. Rawlins and Cole stick together until their ordeal in the Mexican jail: His real name, which is not Blevins, is never revealed.

He is hypersensitive to mockery and insult, anything impinging on his dignity. This sensitivity led him to run away from his abusive stepfather, and it also leads to his death: She is quite beautiful: There is always an attitude of sorrow about her, of tragedy waiting to happen.

Alejandra and Cole fall in love and start an illicit affair. The discovery of the affair results in Don Hector turning Cole in to the Mexican police. When Cole returns from jail he spends one more passionate, tragic day with Alejandra: She has been manipulated by her cynical great-aunt, Alfonsa.

Don Hector, a member of the Mexican aristocracy, is intelligent and cultured, seeming both practical and kind. He is impressed by Cole, and promotes him to the position of breeder.

But when he discovers that Cole has been having an illicit affair with his daughter Alejandra, Don Hector is unforgiving, turning the Americans over to the lawless Mexican police. She lives at the ranch of her nephew, Don Hector. An intelligent and intuitive student of human nature, Alfonsa had an aristocratic upbringing and a cosmopolitan, European education.

In her youth she was what she calls a "freethinker," allied with the forces that would bring about the Mexican civil war on behalf of the oppressed and poverty-stricken working class.

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She fell in love with one of the revolutionary leaders, but was prevented from marrying him by her disapproving family. Her personal sorrows, instead of making her more sensitive, have made her cynical and manipulative. It is she who pays the bribe to get Cole and Rawlins out of jail, but at the price of making Alejandra swear never to see Cole again.

The captain is the man who wrongly accuses Cole and Rawlins of being outlaws, and tortures Rawlins to confess to crimes he did not commit. Later, after accepting a bribe from the charro, a relative of the man Blevins killed, the captain murders Blevins.

When Cole returns after being released from prison, he takes the captain as his hostage. The captain exemplifies the corruption and cruelty rampant in this lawless part of Mexico.

He is a lonely, silent man. She and her son are virtual strangers. When the Americans refuse, he has Rawlins stabbed, and--presumably, although we are never told for certain--pays an assassin to try to kill John Grady.

Characters He looks at the body of his grandfather wrapped in funeral cloth.
All the Pretty Horses: Metaphor Analysis | Novelguide He is a disenfranchised year-old who cannot save his family ranch, which is his rightful legacy. In Mexico, when he finds another ranch and falls in love with the only child of that hacienda's owner, he works very hard to prove himself, in the hopes of perhaps making a future there, but his plan fails.
Cormac McCarthy It is the yearand John Grady Cole has returned to the ranch for the wake of his grandfather. It is dark and cold in the early morning when he learns from the housekeeper that his mother is also in the house.
All the Pretty Horses Part 1 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes John Grady quickly proves himself a master horseman when, with Rawlins' help, he successfully breaks a group of sixteen horses in only three days, a remarkable feat.

Like the captain, the charro is only referred to by his title, not by his name, Luis. He pays the captain a bribe to execute Blevins, who killed a relative of his.

When John Grady Cole returns to Encantada, he forces the charro to show him where he has hidden the American horses. Though she never says so explicitly, she seems deeply sympathetic toward John Grady Cole.

She raised Cole when his mother ran away and went to California.John Grady Cole. The main character of All the Pretty Horses, John Grady Cole certainly does not begin McCarthy's novel as a prototypical Western hero.

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Grady Cole In the novel "All the pretty horses” Grady becomes the central figure, his obsession for horses is seen through his cowboy lifestyle.

He flees off to the West to experience adventurous kind of lifestyle. All the Pretty Horses opens with sixteen year-old John Grady Cole mourning the death of his mother's father.

Since his grandfather had only one child - John Grady's mother- his death means that the Grady name is buried forever. All the Pretty Horses: Metaphor Analysis, Free Study Guides and book notes including comprehensive chapter analysis, complete summary analysis, author biography information, character profiles, theme analysis, metaphor analysis, and top ten quotes on classic literature.

Cormac McCarthy’s All the Pretty Horses is a coming of age story of John Grady Cole who dreams of the mythical west that we have all come to know and love. He himself is a modern recreation of the mythical horsemen that have circled the imagination of all young boys for centuries.

John Grady Cole The protagonist of the novel; the main character around whom most of the story revolves. He is a disenfranchised year-old who cannot save his family ranch, which is his rightful legacy.

In Mexico, when he finds another ranch and falls in love with the only child of that hacienda's.

All the Pretty Horses Part 1 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes