The different literary devices used in the great gatsby a novel by f scott fitzgerald

Show this film only after your child has finished reading the book. Discuss the concept of a person inventing a new persona for him or herself and note that this is similar to the process that each person goes through as they mature from a teenager to an adult, except that it occurs during adulthood and involves a radical departure from what has gone before. If you know anyone who has successfully reinvented themselves to be someone totally different from who they were or from what could be expected given their background, point that out to your child and note some differences and similarities between how that person and Gatsby dealt with the challenges of their lives. Using the Film in the Classroom:

The different literary devices used in the great gatsby a novel by f scott fitzgerald

Lori Steinbach Certified Educator F. Scott Fitzgerald manages to define, praise, and condemn what is known as the American Dream in his most successful novel, The Great Gatsby. The novel is set inand it depicts the American Dream--and its demise--through the use of literary devices and symbols.

One literary device he uses to depict the American Dream is motif; one motif is geography as represented by East and West Egg. West Egg is where the "new rich" live, those who have made a lot of money by being entrepreneurial or criminal in the years after World War I ended.

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It is as if they do not quite know what to do with their newly earned riches and therefore try to "copy" what they perceive to be the possessions and manners of the rich. This is a clear condemnation of the excessive materialism which was the result of pursuing the American Dream.

On the other hand, East Egg is filled with those who have always had money. While they do look like they have class, dignity, and manners things lacking in West-Eggersthey are no better in their excesses than their newly rich neighbors.

The clear message seems to be that the result of the American Dream--wealth--causes destruction. This is a highly symbolic novel, and Fitzgerald uses symbols to represent various aspects of the American Dream.

The first is the Valley of Ashes, a place which depicts the consequences of the self-absorption of the rich. They were careless people, Tom and Daisy--they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money of their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.

The Great Gatsby RAFT Writing Project contains a Common Core-ready writing project for the English/Language Arts or Social Studies initiativeblog.com is a culminating project to end a unit of study on F. Scott Fitzgerald's famous novel. F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby develops a theme of greed and constant discontent within the main characters through literary elements such as tone, symbolism, imagery, and dialogue. In the Great Gatsby the contemporary society of a prosperous America during the time after the war is portrayed by optimist values using money and greed. In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, many colors were used to symbolize many different meanings and show his ideas. One of the most important ones that changed the meaning of the book in the middle is blue.

One of the results of this representative carelessness is the Valley of Ashes. The rich have made their money on industry and carelessly tossed the waste, resulting in this gray, poverty-stricken stretch of land.

The people and the place matter not at all to those who selfishly left their waste for others to live in and deal with, another consequence of the American Dream, according to Fitzgerald. When he was poor, Daisy could not marry him, so he worked hard and achieved the epitome of the American Dream.

The different literary devices used in the great gatsby a novel by f scott fitzgerald

He literally recreated himself from virtually nothing, he made a lot of money through illegal means, though no one seems to care much about thatand he surrounded himself with the material possessions which he thinks will entice Daisy to be with him. Nick philosophically compares the green light to the Pilgrims seeing America for the first time.

The dream soon dies, however. But what he did not know was that it was already behind him, somewhere in the vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.Characterization is a literary device that is used step by step in literature to highlight and explain the details about a character in a story.

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Great Gatsby - New York Essays Scott Fitzgerald, there is a distinct development of emotions and symbols, and one of the key vehicles for illustrating this change is the final line of each chapter.

Scott Fitzgerald) This division is reinforced at the end of the novel when Nick supports Gatsby against the rest of the folk. In ‘The Great Gatsby’ by F. Scott-Fitzgerald, the setting has an extremely central part to play in the reader’s appreciation of the text as a whole. ‘The Great Gatsby’ is set in ’s America and is a highly symbolic reflection of this time in America as a whole, in the particular collapse of .

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s famous novel, is one of the greatest pieces of literature out initiativeblog.com, perhaps, it is best remembered and spoken about for its color symbolism.

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For example, at the end of the novel, green color symbolism is used to depict the limitless promises of an unachievable dream which the main character, Gatsby, pursues until the very end. Introduction.

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s masterpiece The Great Gatsby was written in a time of social decadence, in which values no longer played an important role among the war-shattered population. The “Roaring Twenties” were shaped by the post-war generation and especially by the newly rich and wannabe famous, whose life circled around parties, money and affairs.

Literary Devices in The Great Gatsby F.

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Scott Fitzgerald uses literary devices such as personification, hyperbole, oxymoron, imagery, and simile to convey the tone and mood of The Great Gatsby.

Personification Hyperbole Oxymoron Imagery ". In the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jay Gatsby and the lesser character Myrtle Wilson both try to reach their goal, their American dream; however, their fate reflects an important statement on the true nature of such a dream.

An Introduction to the Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald