The gentle lamb and the menacing tyger in songs of innocence and experience by william blake

Blake makes a similarity between a lamb and a child which are both gentle, mild and crooning, giving us the sense of its softness and child-like nature. Both poems explore how presence of innocence, goodness and unity can be challenged by the presence of experience which is destruction or the powers of evil.

The gentle lamb and the menacing tyger in songs of innocence and experience by william blake

The lamb is a universal symbol of selfless innocence, Jesus the Lamb is the gentle imagination, the Divine Humanity. The poem presents the ideal of charity substantiating Christian compassion and caritas or caring, the ideals of the Lamb of God.

However, the Christian connotations also contain the implications of sacrifice, death and tragedy; Christ the human sacrifice who look upon himself the sings of the world.

Repetition in the first and last couplet of each stanza turns these lines into a refrain, and helps in providing the poem its song-like quality. Little Lamb who made thee Dost thou know who made thee The Lamb is a didactic poem.

In this poem the poet pays a tribute to Lord Christ who was innocent and pure like a child and meek and mild like a lamb. The little child asks the lamb if he knows who has created it, who has blessed it with life and with the capacity to feed by the stream and over the meadow.

The child asks him if the lamb knows who has given it bright and soft wool, which serves as its clothing, who has given it a tender voice which fills the valley with joy. The lamb has been blessed with life and with the capacity to feed by the stream and over the meadow; it has been endowed with bright and soft wool which serves as its clothing; it has a tender voice which fills the valley with joy.

Songs of Innocence and Experience. European Literature

The readers here are provided with a true portrait of a lamb. In the poem the child of innocence repeatedly asks the lamb as to who made him. Does he know who created him the lamb? The same question has been put repeatedly all through the first lines of the poem. The child addresses Little Lamb to ask him who made him and wants to ascertain whether he knows who made him.

The child wants to know who gave the Lamb his life, who fed him while living along the river on the other said of the meadow. H also wants to know from the Lamb who supplied him with pleasant body-cover clothing which is softest, full of wool and shining.

The Lamb is also asked by the child who gave him such delicate bleating voice, which resounds a happy note in the surrounding valleys. He is called by thy name, For he calls himself a Lamb: Little Lamb God bless thee.

The gentle lamb and the menacing tyger in songs of innocence and experience by william blake

In the second stanza of the poem, there is an identification of the lamb, Christ, and the child. Christ has another name, that is, Lamb, because Christ is meek and mild like lamb.

Christ was also a child when he first appeared on this earth as the Son of God. Hence the appropriateness of the following lines: The child shows his deep joy in the company of the lamb who is just like him, meek and mild. The poem conveys the spirit of childhood — the purity, the innocence, the tenderness of childhood and the affection that a child feels for little creatures.

A religious note is introduced in the poem because of the image of Christ as a child.

Blake The Tyger Essays, Free Blake The Tyger Essays

The Lamb is a pastoral poem. The pastoral poem note in Blake is another symbol of joy and innocence. The child says that the person, who has created the Lamb and has given many gifts described in the first stanza, is himself by the name of the Lamb. It is Jesus Christ who calls himself a Lamb.William Blake included “The Tyger” in his poetry anthology “Songs of Experience”, whereas “The Lamb” was placed in the anthology “Songs of Innocence”.

Compare and contrast these poems, and consider why each was positioned in its particular anthology. Born into eighteenth century Victorian England, William Blake was subject to an unstable upbringing into a rapidly changing society.

The Songs of Innocence and of Experience were intended by Blake to show ‘the two contrary states of the human soul’.

The Tyger is the contrary poem to The Lamb in the Songs of Innocence. The Lamb is about a kindly God who ‘calls himself a Lamb’ and is himself meek and mild. William Blake’s “The Lamb” & The two poems written by William Blake feature animals that are antithetical, one symbolizing the goodness, peace, harmony and unity in the world whilst the other the presence of darkness in the world.

The gentle lamb and the menacing tyger in songs of innocence and experience by william blake

"The Lamb" was published in as part of a larger work, Songs of Innocence, which is itself part of Songs of Innocence and Experience. This collection is Blake's most famous work, and it's more than the sum of its parts.

Blake’s Songs Of Innocence And Experience Analysis. In William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience, the gentle lamb and the dire tiger define childhood by setting a contrast between the innocence of youth and the experience of age.

In William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience, the gentle lamb and the dire tiger define childhood by setting a contrast between the innocence of youth and the experience of age. The Lamb is written with childish repetitions and a selection of words which could satisfy any audience under the age of .

The Tyger and The Lamb Essay – Free Papers and Essays Examples